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 Post subject: Seatpost Length
PostPosted: Thu Feb 03, 2005 2:38 pm 
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Joined: Thu Feb 03, 2005 2:34 pm
Posts: 5
Location: Pennsylvania
Is there a recommended amount of seatpost which should be inside a Rockhound frame? Does the seatpost need to extend any particular amount inside the seattube (or below the toptube junction)?

I run Thomson posts and understand that the minimum insertion line is there to ensure that the post doesn't fail. However, I also know there needs to be enough post inside the frame so the seattube doesn't crack under load.

Just don't want any harm to come to my Rockhound...

Thanks.

- khill


Last edited by khill on Fri Feb 04, 2005 9:57 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 03, 2005 11:49 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 05, 2004 1:05 am
Posts: 45
Location: anch ak
khill,
You want AT LEAST TWO INCHES OF SEATPOST TO EXTEND PAST THE BOTTOM OF THE TOP TUBE. Happy Trails 8)


Gunnerluver


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2005 3:00 am 
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Joined: Mon Jan 31, 2005 10:05 pm
Posts: 12
Location: D.C. Capital of Capitalism
good advice, just remember to take it out and grease it now and then.

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two Gunnars, one Waterford, And I still want more


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 Post subject: Thanks
PostPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2005 9:58 am 
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Joined: Thu Feb 03, 2005 2:34 pm
Posts: 5
Location: Pennsylvania
I suspected I needed a longer post.

I guess I'll have to spring for the 410mm thomson since the 330mm only gives me about 3/4" - 1" below the toptube junction.

Thanks for the info.

- khill


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 Post subject: grease is your friend
PostPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2005 2:11 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 05, 2004 1:05 am
Posts: 45
Location: anch ak
Just like "levelreed" said,be sure to grease the post(and anything that is threaded). We had a dude come in to the shop with a time welded seatpost in his bike. The post and seat tube had become one. With the post clamp in a bench vise,two guys,two hours and a can of liquid wrench, we were able to remove the post. Sadly,the post didn't survive :(

gunnerluver


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 Post subject: Oh, it's greased
PostPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2005 3:34 pm 
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Joined: Thu Feb 03, 2005 2:34 pm
Posts: 5
Location: Pennsylvania
I strip and overhaul all the parts on all my bikes at least twice a year. The seatposts are always greased thoroughly (in addition to all the other threaded parts) when I pull everything apart. Also gives me a chance to check the waterproofing and reapply Boeshield as needed.

After reading about delicate operations with a hacksaw blade on Sheldon Brown's site and hearing stories like yours (involving a vise and lots of grunting), I make sure to avoid such sticky situations. :D

Thanks.

- khill


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 05, 2005 2:52 am 
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Joined: Mon Jan 31, 2005 10:05 pm
Posts: 12
Location: D.C. Capital of Capitalism
We had a hotdog come into our shop in the same shape. We had to vice the seat post and spin the bike around it once we got it broken loose. We iced the seat tube while we did it, because it got too hot to touch. The seat post was junked, but the owner knew that would happen. I have had to cut them out before.

I tend to buy the longer post, and cut it down if I need to.

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two Gunnars, one Waterford, And I still want more


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